Beitrag Go for the cabbage - nutrition tips for the cold season

Go for the cabbage - nutrition tips for the cold season

Cabbage is the vegetable for the cold season - it ripens in late autumn, can be stored well and is thus available throughout the winter. Cabbage deserves to be called a "superfood". Whether white, red or green cabbage, broccoli or Brussels sprouts, they all contain plenty of fibre, vitamins, minerals and also important bitter substances, which belong to the so-called secondary plant substances.

Cabbage is the vegetable for the cold season - it ripens in late autumn, can be stored well and is thus available throughout the winter. Cabbage deserves to be called a "superfood". Whether white, red or green cabbage, broccoli or Brussels sprouts, they all contain plenty of fibre, vitamins, minerals and also important bitter substances, which belong to the so-called secondary plant substances. Fermented cabbage, such as fresh sauerkraut or kimchi, the Korean variety, is particularly healthy. Do-it-yourself is in again - there are plenty of recipes on the internet. The lactic acid bacteria contained in fermented vegetables are particularly good for an intact intestinal flora.


Source: blende12 | Pixabay


Healthy bitter substances are not only found in cabbage, but also in green leafy vegetables such as chard and spinach, in endive, chicory, aubergines or artichokes. Unfortunately, a certain aversion to bitter taste is innate as a protection against possibly poisonous food. In the production of finished products, the bitter taste is often softened by soaking or adding sugar, salt or flavourings. The original bitter taste of many vegetables or lettuce varieties is also reduced through breeding.

Bitter substances are even used in naturopathy, especially for digestive disorders. These bitter substances promote the release of digestive juices, improve fat digestion, regulate appetite and hunger, and are also said to strengthen the body's defences. To make better use of the bitter substances, it is advisable to buy cabbage and other vegetables fresh and prepare them yourself. Olive oil and spices such as turmeric, mustard seeds and cinnamon also contain healthy bitter substances. Wild herbs such as nettles, dandelion or goutweed are also good sources of bitter. They can be gathered in the meadow or in your own garden, and no bitter taste has been bred out of them yet.

Further information and advice on healthy nutrition can be obtained from our consumer advice centres.


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